Rachel, what is the name of your presentation?

ADHD in the Workplace: Superpower or Super Pain?

Why does your topic mean something to you?

As a woman with late-diagnosed ADHD and an Equity, Diversity & Inclusion professional I have unique insights and knowledge to share with an engaged audience that will improve the workplace experience for people with ADHD.

What is a key takeaway you’re hoping the audience leaves with?

Breaking down the misconceptions and stereotypes of what adult ADHD is, and isn’t.How to build a team culture of psychological safety so employees and leaders with ADHD can spend less energy trying to keep their neurotypical mask in place and more time being productive.What types of tools, resources and accommodations in the workplace are helpful for people with ADHD.

What’s a question you hope to be asked following your session?

How can a leader or employer help an employee if they haven’t disclosed that they have ADHD?

What is something people should know about you?

Finding ways to give back to my community is important to me, be they big or small acts of service. Sometimes this looks like serving on a non-profit board, other times it may be filling the community fridge with groceries or volunteering to foster dogs for a local rescue organization.

Anything else you’d like to add for people attending the conference?

How someone experiences one aspect of their diversity is impacted by the various intersections of their identity. For me, that includes being diagnosed with ADHD late in life vs. as a child, being a woman, being white, being an Equity, Diversity & Inclusion professional, being born and raised in Calgary, and the list goes on.